Last edited by Vonris
Sunday, August 9, 2020 | History

4 edition of Mechanical properties of salvaged dead yellow-cedar in southeast Alaska found in the catalog.

Mechanical properties of salvaged dead yellow-cedar in southeast Alaska

Mechanical properties of salvaged dead yellow-cedar in southeast Alaska

phase 1

  • 136 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, WI .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Callitropsis nootkatensis -- Alaska,
  • Callitropsis nootkatensis

  • Edition Notes

    StatementKent A. McDonald ... [et al.].
    SeriesResearch paper FPL -- RP-565., Research paper FPL -- 565.
    ContributionsMcDonald, Kent A., Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination9 p.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17834361M
    OCLC/WorldCa39608175

    Journal of Chemical Ecology, Vol. 31, No. 11, November () DOI: /~l CHANGES IN HEARTWOOD CHEMISTRY OF DEAD YELLOW-CEDAR TREES THAT REMAIN STANDING FOR 80 YEARS OR MORE IN SOUTHEAST ALASKA RICK G. KELSEY,'~' PAUL E. HENNON: MANUELA WSO,' and JOSEPH J. KARCHESY~ ' USDA Forest Service, Pacijc . Yellow Cedar is found only on the Pacific coast of North America from Alaska to southern Oregon and is the hardest known cedar in the world. Considered the crown jewel around boat builders, it has exceptional resistance to weather and insects. The various physical properties of yellow cedar make it an attractive material for general construction.

    Flexuaral Properties of Salvaged Dead Yellow-Cedar from Southeast Alaska. Forest Products Journal, 52(1), pp Verrill, S. Rolling your own: Linear model hypothesis testing and power calculations via the singular value decomposition. Statistical Computing and Graphics,, Vol No. 1, pp. Winter. A slow growing tree found along the Pacific Coast from Oregon through Canada, and up into Alaska, Alaskan Yellow Cedar trees can grow very tall, which makes it an ideal wood for large timbers used in timber frame construction. It is also commonly referred to as Nootka Cypress.

    A mechanical evaluation of Alaska yellow-cedar.(Ketchikan Wood Technology Center): An article from: Forest Products Journal [Bannister, John, Curtis, Kevin, Barber, Valerie, Miller, Tom] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. A mechanical evaluation of Alaska yellow-cedar.(Ketchikan Wood Technology Center): An article from: Forest Products JournalAuthor: John Bannister, Kevin Curtis, Valerie Barber, Tom Miller. Alaska Yellow Cedar. Though Alaska Yellow Cedar is not a traditional wood, it is gaining popularity. There are a few custom builders using Alaska Yellow Cedar for guitar tops. It is being used more for backs and sides of Flamenco Guitars. It is a denser wood than Red Cedar with a specific gravity very close to Sitka Spruce.


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Mechanical properties of salvaged dead yellow-cedar in southeast Alaska Download PDF EPUB FB2

Mechanical Properties of Salvaged Dead Yellow-Cedar in Southeast Alaska Phase I Kent A. McDonald, Research Wood Scientist Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin Paul E. Hennon, Pathologist National Forest System, Alaska Region, Juneau Forest Health Office, Juneau, Alaska.

Yellow-cedar snags (dead trees) could be important to the economy in southeast Alaska, if some high-value uses for the snags could be established. Due to the high decay resistance of yellow-cedar, the rate of deterioration is so slow that snags may remain standing for a century or more after death.

Get this from a library. Mechanical properties of salvaged dead yellow-cedar in southeast Alaska: Phase I. [Kent A McDonald; Paul E Hennon; John H Stevens; David W Green; Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.)] -- An intensive decline and mortality problem is affecting yellow-cedar trees in southeast Alaska.

Yellow-cedar snags (dead trees) could be important to the economy in southeast Alaska. A decline and mortality problem affects yellow-cedar trees on more than a half-million acres in southeast Alaska (Fig.

1) (15). On average, 65 percent of the basal area of yellow-cedar is dead on these sites (12). Get this from a library. Mechanical properties of salvaged dead yellow-cedar in southeast Alaska: phase 1.

[Kent A McDonald; Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.);]. Mechanical properties of salvaged dead yellow-cedar in southeast Alaska Phase I / Kent A. McDonald, et al.

Alaska Yellow Cedar is famed for its extraordinary natural resistance to rot, decay, weather and insects. Studies have shown that the mechanical properties of lumber sawn from Alaska Yellow Cedar trees that have been dead for over 80 years meet or exceed those properties of lumber sawn from living trees of other softwood species.

“Yellow Cedar” is what we call it here (Terrace, BC – just east of the Alaskan Panhandle). I had no idea that it was called “Alaskan Yellow Cedar” until I came to this website. I use it for carvings – it costs about $/bd ft from a local sawmill.

We measured the concentrations of extractable bioactive compounds in heartwood of live yellow-cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis) trees and five classes of standing snags (1–5, averaging 4, 14, 26, 51, and 81 years-since-death, respectively) to determine how the concentrations changed in the slowly deteriorating snags.

Three individuals from each of these six condition classes were sampled at. Mechanical Properties of Salvaged Dead Yellow-Cedar in Southeast Alaska Phase I. An intensive decline and mortality problem is affecting yellow-cedar trees in southeast Alaska. Yellow-cedar. Mechanical properties of salvaged dead yellow-cedar in southeast Alaska [microform]: phase 1 / Kent A.

Annotated bibliography of Chamaecyparis nootkatensis [microform] / P.E. Hennon, A.S. Harris, compilers; Board-foot and cubic-foot volume tables for Western redcedar in southeast Alaska [microform] / Donald J.

Mechanical properties of salvaged dead yellow-cedar in southeast Alaska: phase 1. USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin, Res. Pap. FPL-RP Google Scholar. A decline and mortality problem is affecting yellow-cedar trees on more than a half-million acres in southeast Alaska.

Because of the high decay resistance of yellow-cedar, dead snags may remain. McDonald KA, Hennon PE, Stevens JH, Green DW () Mechanical properties of salvaged dead yellow-cedar in southeast Alaska.

USDA For Serv Res Pap FPL–RP– Morales-Ramos JA, Rojas MG, Hennon PE () Black-staining fungus effects on the natural resistance properties of Alaskan yellow cedar to the Formosan subterranean termite (Isoptera.

Alaskan Yellow Cedar Scientific Name: Chamaecyparis nootkatensis. Other common names: Nootka cypress, sitka cypress, pacific yellow cedar. Found only on the Pacific coast of North America, Yellow Cedar is the hardest known cedar in the world.

Prized by boat builders, it has exceptional resistance to weather and insects as well as easy workability. Progress 10/01/01 to 09/30/02 Outputs Yellow-cedar is one of the most valuable species in Alaska. A decline and mortality problem is affecting yellow-cedar on more than a half-million acres in southeast Alaska.

Because of its high decay resistance, dead snags may remain standing for more than years. Page dedicated to Alaskan Yellow Cedar and its close cousin Port Orford Cedar. In addition to our full offering of western red cedar fence products, split rail, boards and timbers We also carry an extensive inventory of Alaskan Yellow Cedar in appearance grade and clears.

Because of our purchasing power we are able to offer this rare and sought. Alaskan Yellow Cedar (AYC) is known for the beauty of its uniform yellow color, the strength of its fine even-texture and straight grain, and durability in outdoor applications.

Ideally suited for almost any outdoor or indoor project including patio covers, decks, gardens, trim, paneling and more. Yellow cedar trees can live more than 1, years and are a key part of southeast Alaska Native culture. Native Alaska Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian people use the rot.

The Alaskan Yellow Cedar grows along the Pacific coast of North America from Oregon up into Canada and Alaska. It likes moist climates, and thus it is only found along coastal areas. Due to the colder temperatures and high rainfall of its local climate, Yellow Cedar grows very slowly with closely packed growth rings and very little distinction between early wood and late wood rings.

This makes. CHANGES IN HEARTWOOD CHEMISTRY OF DEAD YELLOW-CEDAR TREES THAT REMAIN STANDING FOR 80 YEARS OR MORE IN SOUTHEAST ALASKA RICK G. KELSEY,1,* PAUL E.

HENNON,2 MANUELA HUSO,3 and JOSEPH J. KARCHESY4 1USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Jefferson Way, Corvallis, ORUSA.By: Molly Tankersley. Across the temperate rainforest of Southeast Alaska, a change is taking root.

Warming winters are reducing snowpack in the region and causing a massive decline in a culturally, economically, and ecologically important tree species; yellow-cedar. The natural properties of yellow cedar make it a perfect choice for putting on top of foundations because of the woodâ s high durability and resistance to insects,â said Stevens.

â I think it.